The Importance of No-fault Divorce and What it Could Mean for You

If you and your spouse are thinking about dissolving your marriage, you have the option of filing a fault or no-fault divorce. While there are some advantages to each, unless circumstances demand it, filing for a no-fault divorce is often easier, faster, and even more affordable. To learn more about no-fault divorce in North Carolina,…

Common Myths About Getting a Divorce that People Still Think Are True

When you married your spouse, divorce was probably the last thing on your mind. In fact, even if you and your spouse formed a prenuptial agreement, separating in the future wasn’t something you were planning on. As such, if you’re considering dissolving your marriage now, you may have some preconceived notions about the divorce process…

How Does Moving Out of State Affect Child Custody in North Carolina?

During the course of your life, you may relocate out of North Carolina for any number of reasons. This is true even for parents who have custody arrangements concerning their children. These reasons can include taking a new job, remarriage, or moving to be closer to your family. How can leaving the state affect child…

How Should I Prepare for a Child Custody Case in North Carolina?

Child custody cases are one of the most emotionally difficult experiences a parent may encounter. It is always best for parents to try to resolve their differences by way of a parenting agreement. When parents cannot agree, however, the courthouse is usually the next step. If you have never experienced family court in North Carolina,…

Using Text Messages to Prove Adultery in North Carolina

Adultery is a crime in North Carolina. The actions of an adulterous spouse can have far-reaching impacts on civil matters as well, including your divorce case. Alimony, child custody, and even property distribution may be affected. This article will discuss the effects of adultery and using one form of evidence, text messages, to prove it…

What are the North Carolina Child Support Guidelines?

Calculation of child support in most North Carolina cases is set to presumptive guidelines. These rules provide a reasonable and appropriate amount of support for the child or children. Section 50-13.4 of the North Carolina General Statutes requires review of the guidelines at least every four years. The purpose of this review is to ensure…